After disaster, what do we learn?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Simone is about 9 weeks old, current on vaccinations and litter box-trained. She enjoys being cuddled when she is not playing and has quite a healthy purr. (Contributed)

By RONNIE CASEY |

PUBLISHED: September 4, 2020 at 1:28 p.m. | UPDATED: September 4, 2020 at 1:35 p.m.

 

After a natural disaster, images of the horrifying destruction dominate our newsfeeds. Most of the focus is on the devastation wreaked upon the landscape, homes, and businesses, or on the resultant human suffering and loss. But in any disaster where people suffer and die, pets and livestock also suffer and die. The consequences are beyond measure. In 1999, Hurricane Floyd caused 2.9 million pet and livestock deaths, in addition to the thousands of pets which were never reunited with their owners. In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the Louisiana SPCA estimates that 15,500 animals were rescued, but as many as 104,000 pets were left behind to fend for themselves. Of the animals rescued, only 15% were reunited with their owners, which is better than the national average of 10%.

 

As of this writing, according to Cal Fire thus far for 2020, there have been 7,175 wildfires resulting in 1,660,332 burned acres and 3,042 structures damaged or destroyed. Thousands of people were forced to evacuate, causing hundreds of cats, dogs, horses, and other livestock to be left behind. Many emergency shelters (such as those provided by the American Red Cross) do not admit pets, and owners are hard-put to find alternative housing for their animals in an emergent situation. Free-roaming animals are inevitably lost or left behind. In addition, studies have found that as many as 20 % of residents will refuse to evacuate because they will not leave their animals, endangering their own lives, as well as the lives of the people sent to rescue them. Some animal shelters will accept pets during disasters, but we know disasters can also threaten them, as well. Many are already operating at full capacity and do not have the room to accommodate a large influx of animals.

 

Because of these facts, the ASPCA conducted a nationwide assessment of emergency response capabilities for animals, the results for which are in an article titled “The National Capabilities for Animal Response in Emergencies (NCARE) Study: An Assessment of U.S. States and Counties.” The study showed progress has been made, but there is still a great deal to do. Only about half of high-population cities and counties in the US have an infrastructure for managing animals in a disaster, such as a state or county animal response team. In addition, only about one in four smaller counties have such an organization in regions much like ours, who are prone to frequent natural disasters, such as wildfires. As well, only a little more than one-half of U.S. counties have plans for emergency shelters in which pets and people can be housed together.

 

Most animal deaths occur within the first 24 to 48 hours of a disaster onset, when local response is critical. That loss of animal life can have not only a huge economic consequence in agricultural areas such as ours, but also a devastating psychological impact on the humans suffering those losses. Communities with well-developed animal response plans, along with trained and equipped animal response teams, are better able to protect resident livestock and companion animals during a disaster, with fewer animals lost, higher human evacuation compliance rates, and a greater percentage of pets staying with their families.

 

The resources available to us play a significant role in how we make our decisions. When people have limited access to viable resources, they become extremely more vulnerable when a natural disaster occurs. People who do not have a car, for example, may not be able to take their animals on public transportation. Even if the owner evacuates with their animals, the question of their care becomes complicated for all involved. Human shelters are not prepared to care for animals, even if they accept them, and having enough supplies for care becomes problematic.

 

The public needs rapid information about what to do with animals when and if the order to evacuate is given. It is the one question that continually arises. If our goal is for people to prepare in advance, then foreknowledge of where animals go would be enormously worthwhile. Unfortunately, the information is often provided after-the-fact, and not easily available to those in the midst of fleeing. A possible solution is to advance designate “pet friendly” shelters. These human shelters would have a nearby area already designated for animals. A fairground serves as an ideal example. People can be housed in exhibition buildings, while other enclosed areas and stables can shelter animals, including livestock. If we can reduce the number of lost animals, it could mitigate the burden on local shelters which, we know, typically operate on limited resources and with limited staff even under normal conditions.

 

In this country the plight of animals is often viewed as a response issue and is frequently handled by groups that are not integrated with the community’s emergency management. Animals, their owners, and communities could greatly benefit from integrating animal evacuation issues into an overall emergency management strategy.

 

Hopefully, we have learned that disaster planning for individuals and for our communities must include animals and become a critical element in community disaster planning and response strategies.

 

Ronnie Casey has been volunteering with the Tehama County Animal Care Center since relocating in 2011. A retired R.N., she strives to help animals in need within Tehama county. She can be reached at rmcredbluff@gmail.com.

 

Pets also suffer during wildfires

 

 

Tex is a 4-year-old, heartworm negative shepherd mix who would prefer to live in a home by himself because he bonds easily to his people. He does get along with female dogs. (Contributed)

By RONNIE CASEY |

PUBLISHED: August 28, 2020 at 3:23 p.m. | UPDATED: August 28, 2020 at 6:03 p.m.

 

As of this writing it seems like all of California is being impacted by fire, either directly or indirectly. Sadly, this does not only affect people. While most of the focus is on the destruction of the landscape, personal property loss, or on the resultant human suffering, it is important to be aware that in any disaster where people suffer, pets and livestock are also traumatized.

We have seen on the news that the air quality from the smoke from these multiple wildfires is ranging from unhealthy for specific groups to hazardous for everyone, including pets, livestock, and wildlife. If you can see or feel the effects of smoke, then be assured the animals are feeling the same, and it is up to you to take precautions to keep them safe. If you are wondering what the air quality is like in your area, check out the “Real-time Air Quality Index Visual Map” (https://aqicn.org/map/california/).

Animals with cardiovascular or respiratory disease are especially at risk from smoke and should be closely monitored during any period of poor air quality.  Smoke inhalation is a serious medical condition and should not be taken lightly. Chemicals released from burned materials such as carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and cyanide are dangerous and poisonous.  Inhalation of these chemicals can result in severe lung injury, burnt airways, and even death.  Please consult a veterinarian if any animal is experiencing the following: Severe coughing or gagging/vomiting; difficulty breathing, including open mouth breathing and increased noise when breathing; red, inflamed eyes; bright red, blue or pale mucous membranes; nasal discharge; foaming at the mouth; lethargy or weakness; disorientation or stumbling; reduced appetite and/or thirst; and any signs of being burnt such as singed fur and skin.

If you are not able to take your pet to a veterinarian right away, place the pet in a steamy room or near a humidifier to increase the amount of moisture in their lungs. The amount of damage to the pet may not be apparent for several hours, therefore it is imperative to take the pet to a veterinarian as soon as is possible.

How can you protect them? First, keep pets indoors as much as possible, and be sure to keep windows shut. Decrease the amount of exercise time your pet gets outside.  Avoid long walks and strenuous exercise.  Normal exercise can resume when air quality returns to normal. Only let dogs and cats outside for brief bathroom breaks if air quality alerts are in effect. Remember also, that pet birds are particularly susceptible and should not be allowed outside when smoke or particulate matter is present. Above all, always include your animals in any disaster preparedness planning you do.

The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) recommends the following to protect livestock. Limit their exercise when smoke is visible. Especially do not require the animals to perform activities that substantially increases airflow into the lungs. Always provide plenty of fresh water near feeding areas. Dust exposure can be limited by feeding low-dust or dust-free feeds and sprinkling or misting the holding area(s).

In addition, plan to give livestock 4 to 6 weeks to recuperate after the air quality returns to normal. Attempting to handle, move, or transport livestock may delay healing and compromise the animals’ performance. Again, have a livestock evacuation plan ready in advance. The AVMA provides a comprehensive one at (https://www.avma.org/resources/pet-owners/emergencycare/large-animals-and-livestock-disasters ) .

Also, it is important to understand that beyond the initial impact of trauma from a disaster, animals may also suffer psychosocial aspects of trauma. First, as we all know, pets have a keen sense of smell.  They will be able to smell smoke from far away and may become irritable or frightened. Other possible emotional consequences for pets can be aggression, separation anxiety syndrome, phobias, compulsive behavior, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

The disruption of routine activities can be the biggest cause of stress for pets, so try to re-establish a normal schedule as quickly as you can. Comfort each other. The simple act of petting and snuggling can reduce anxiety for both yourself and your pets.

In addition, in the days and weeks that follow a disaster, homes, landmarks and familiar scents that animals use to find their way home or recognize safe areas have simply vanished. This can cause disorientation, panic and stress, and lead helpless strays and displaced pets to face many hazardous, life-threatening situations. Upon their return, reintroduce food in small servings, gradually working up to full portions if the animals have been without food for a prolonged period. In addition, allow uninterrupted rest and sleep to allow them to recover from the trauma incurred.

Hopefully you will never have to deal with the trauma of a fire taking your home.  However, certain measures should be taken if you and your pet are near a wildfire, even if you think you are not in harms’ way.

Ronnie Casey has been volunteering with the Tehama County Animal Care Center since relocating in 2011. A retired R.N., she strives to help animals in need within Tehama county. She can be reached at rmcredbluff@gmail.com.

More News Articles of interest

PawPrints fundraiser a success for PETS

By RED BLUFF DAILY NEWS |

PUBLISHED: August 7, 2020 at 2:28 p.m. | UPDATED: August 7, 2020 at 2:30 p.m.

The 2020 Nu-Way PawPrints fundraiser for PETS, or Providing Essentials for Tehama Shelter, is complete for the fifth year running.

More PawPrints and donations were garnered this year than in any past year. The support of Nu-Way and the all-important checkers was phenomenal. Every checker contributed to this great success. The organization thanks the people of Los Molinos who shopped at Nu-Way.

Lost dogs looking for way home again after holiday celebrations

By GEORGE JOHNSTON | gjohnston@redbluffdailynews.com | Red Bluff Daily News

PUBLISHED: July 7, 2020 at 6:00 p.m. | UPDATED: July 8, 2020 at 1:14 p.m.

 

RED BLUFF — The Tehama County Animal Care Center is looking to return the many dogs that ran away from home during the Fourth of July holiday due to the noise of fireworks celebrations.

Pawprints 2020 (5th year running)

 

By RED BLUFF DAILY NEWS |

PUBLISHED: June 24, 2020 at 2:11 p.m. | UPDATED: June 24, 2020 at 2:12 p.m.

For the fifth year in a row, a PawPrints fundraiser for Providing Essentials for Tehama Shelter, or PETS, is planned at Nu-Way Market, 8049 SR 99E in Los Molinos.

Nu-Way is sponsoring and the start date is July 5. The campaign will run through the end of the month.

Animal care center in Tehama County is lowering fees for holiday adoption event

RED BLUFF, Calif. — On Thursday, the Tehama County Animal Care Center

 

(TCACC) kicked off their fifth annual "Home for the Holidays" pet adoption event.

Those looking to adopt have until Saturday to take advantage of discounted fees and prices.

TCACC says every dog is $25 and under and every cat four months or older is free. Kittens are $10.

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Free spay and neuter clinic coming to Tehama County

By RED BLUFF DAILY NEWS |

PUBLISHED: December 18, 2019 at 3:03 pm | UPDATED: December 18, 2019 at 3:27 pm

 

The Tehama County Animal Care Center will be holding a pet adoption event Dec. 19-21.  During the fifth annual Home for the Holidays event, the center will reduce adoption fees for all dogs to $25 or less, all kittens will be $10 and all adult cats will be available free. Staff are hoping to use this adoption event to find every dog and cat in the shelter a new home before the new year begins.

170 local nonprofits will benefit from North State Giving Tuesday

Posted Nov 24, 2019 at 12:01 AM

Hosted by Shasta Regional Community Foundation and Merchants Bank of Commerce, North State Giving Tuesday is a 14-hour online giving event to benefit more than 170 nonprofits in Shasta, Siskiyou and Tehama counties.

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Free spay and neuter clinic coming to Tehama County

By RED BLUFF DAILY NEWS |

PUBLISHED: October 14, 2019 at 5:37 pm | UPDATED: October 14, 2019 at 5:38 pm

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Tehama County Animal Care Center will be hosting a three-day spay/neuter clinic in Tehama County, courtesy of the Peninsula Humane Society and SPCA.

Adopt a feline star during Purr-miere Friday

By RED BLUFF DAILY NEWS |

PUBLISHED: September 5, 2019 at 5:30 pm | UPDATED: September 5, 2019 at 5:32 pm

In celebration of Free Cat Friday, the Tehama County Animal Care Center will undergo a transformation into Purrywood on its all day Purr-miere Friday, Sept. 13

Los Molinos market hosts Paw Prints fundraiser for PETS

By RED BLUFF DAILY NEWS |

August 12, 2019 at 4:53 pm

The Nu-Way Paw Prints fundraiser for Providing Essentials for Tehama Shelter, or PETS, was a howling success for the fourth year in a row.

Los Molinos market hosts Paw Prints fundraiser for PETS

By Red Bluff Daily News |

PUBLISHED: July 1, 2019 at 5:50 pm | UPDATED: July 1, 2019 at 5:51 pm

 

Nu-Way Market in Los Molinos is sponsoring the fourth annual month-long fundraiser for Providing Essentials for Tehama Shelter, or PETS.

Not Cho’ Grandma’s Bingo becomes Red Bluff trend

 

By JULIE ZEEB | jzeeb@redbluffdailynews.com | Red Bluff Daily News

PUBLISHED: June 24, 2019 at 6:47 pm | UPDATED: June 24, 2019 at 6:48 pm

RED BLUFF — What started as a one-time event has turned into a trend with games selling out in under an hour, prompting Saturday’s Not Cho’ Grandma’s Bingo event to offer two rounds at The Enjoy Store.

Not Cho’ Grandma’s Bingo becomes Red Bluff trend

 

By JULIE ZEEB | jzeeb@redbluffdailynews.com | Red Bluff Daily News

PUBLISHED: June 24, 2019 at 6:47 pm | UPDATED: June 24, 2019 at 6:48 pm

RED BLUFF — What started as a one-time event has turned into a trend with games selling out in under an hour, prompting Saturday’s Not Cho’ Grandma’s Bingo event to offer two rounds at The Enjoy Store.

Red Bluff council to mull grant funding, pet adoption Tuesday

 

By JAKE HUTCHISON | jhutchison@redbluffdailynews.com | Red Bluff Daily News

PUBLISHED: April 1, 2019 at 6:16 pm | UPDATED: April 1, 2019 at 6:17 pm

 

RED BLUFF — Grant funding for a proposed Splash Park as well as changes to a pet adoption ordinance are on tap for Tuesday evening’s City Council meeting.

Animal shelter receives crates for pet transport

 

By JULIE ZEEB | jzeeb@redbluffdailynews.com | Red Bluff Daily News

PUBLISHED: February 7, 2019 at 6:00 pm | UPDATED: February 7, 2019 at 6:01 pm

 

RED BLUFF — The Tehama County Animal Care Center has received a helping hand in the form of a Shasta Regional Community Foundation grant that allowed it to purchase crates needed to transport animals.

The grant was a collaboration between Providing Essentials for the Tehama Shelter, PETS, and the care center, said PETS Vice President Ronnie Casey.

Hometown heroes honored Saturday

 

By BILL CORNELIUS |

PUBLISHED: January 15, 2019 at 3:54 pm | UPDATED: January 15, 2019 at 3:56 pm

 

RED BLUFF — The majority of Tehama County’s first responders and veterans organizations were well-represented at the Not Every Hero Wears a Cape event Saturday hosted by Providing Essentials for Tehama Shelter, or PETS, at the State Theatre.

The event, which included a special screening of “Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero,” was a chance for the community to come out to meet and thank their hometown heroes, said PETS Vice President Ronnie Casey.

Event to honor first responders, veterans Saturday at State Theatre

 

By JULIE ZEEB | jzeeb@redbluffdailynews.com | Red Bluff Daily News

PUBLISHED: January 16, 2019 at 5:24 pm | UPDATED: January 16, 2019 at 5:25 pm

RED BLUFF — Tehama County will get the chance to honor first responders and veterans, who will be recognized Saturday at a special event hosted by Providing Essentials For Tehama Shelter, or PETS.

Sgt Stubby PSA - KRBH - Spartan Radio 93.1 FM
00:00 / 00:00

Bill Cornelius: A lot has been accomplished in nine years

(& Sgt Stubby)

 

By BILL CORNELIUS |

PUBLISHED: January 15, 2019 at 3:54 pm | UPDATED: January 15, 2019 at 3:56 pm

 

It is almost hard to believe that it has been nine full years since a steering committee was formed to investigate the feasibility of the non-profit, State Theatre for the Arts, purchasing the historic State Theatre for use as a performing and cultural arts center by the entire community.

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Shelter animals hope to go home for the holidays

  • By STAFF REPORTS |

  • PUBLISHED: December 11, 2018 at 3:50 pm | UPDATED: December 11, 2018 at 3:51 pm

  • The Tehama County Animal Care Center will be holding its fourth annual Home for the Holidays pet adoption event Dec. 13-15..

"Home for the Holidays" event

by Patrick Maravelias

  • Tehama County Animal Care Center is reducing adoption fees for its fourth annual "Home for the Holidays" event December 13 through December 15.

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Thousands attend Dairyville Orchard Festival

  • By JULIE ZEEB | jzeeb@redbluffdailynews.com | Red Bluff Daily News

  •  

  • PUBLISHED: October 21, 2018 at 11:09 am | UPDATED: October 21, 2018 at 11:10 am

  • RED BLUFF — Music filled the air and the sun was shinning Saturday for the 21st annual Dairyville Orchard Festival with thousands expected to peruse the various items available at booths spread throughout the field behind Lassen View School.

Free Cat Friday at Tehama County Animal Care Center

RED BLUFF, Calif. — 

The Tehama County Animal Care Center is holding their fourth “Free Cat Friday” adoption event of 2018.

On September 14, in an effort to find forever homes for all adoptable cats, the Animal Care Center will waive the adoption fee for adult cats, making them free to adopt. In addition to free adult cats, kittens for will have their adoption fee dropped to only $10.

Animal Care Center: Free cat adoption event set Friday

PUBLISHED: September 13, 2018 at 5:13 pm | UPDATED: September 13, 2018 at 5:14 pm

The Tehama County Animal Care Center is holding the fourth Free Cat Friday adoption event of this year on Sept. 14.

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Free spay and neuter clinic coming to county

By STAFF REPORTS |

PUBLISHED: September 3, 2018 at 6:05 pm | UPDATED: September 3, 2018 at 6:07 pm

 

RED BLUFF — Tehama County Animal Care Center will be hosting a four-day spay neuter clinic in Tehama County, courtesy of the Peninsula Humane Society & SPCA.

PATRIOTS AND PETS ADOPTION PROGRAM

 

Contact: Ronnie Casey                                                             

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Are you an Active Duty, Reserve, or Veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces?  Are you looking to adopt a furry companion?  Are you interested in giving a shelter pet a second chance at life?  Then the “Patriots and Pets Adoption Program” may be right for you.

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Market hosts fundraiser for shelter animals

 

By STAFF REPORTS |

PUBLISHED: July 5, 2018 at 1:12 pm | UPDATED: July 5, 2018 at 1:28 pm

 

Nu-Way Market, at 8049 State Route 99E in Los Molinos, is sponsoring the third annual fundraiser for Providing Essentials for Tehama Shelter, or PETS.

Distemper case confirmed; shelter quarantines 12 dogs

By Julie Zeeb, Daily News

Red Bluff >> A confirmed case of distemper at the Tehama County Animal Care Center has led the shelter to quarantine 12 dogs, said Manager Christine McClintock.

That Shaggy Mutt? At Dog Museums, Our Drooling Companions Are the StarsBy LAURA M. HOLSON   APRIL 22, 2018

Learn about various Dog Museums you many never have heard of...

Red Bluff students form club to help shelter animals
By Julie Zeeb, Daily News, 

POSTED: 04/19/18, 5:55 PM PDT 

Red Bluff >> A group of Red Bluff Elementary School District fourth grade students are looking to make a difference in the lives of those who reside at the Tehama County Animal Care Center.

“Four of our students at Bidwell Elementary School approached our librarian, Ellie Scott, last year about starting a club for shelter animals,” said teacher Kaillee Hamre.

Feud builds over trapping in Red Bluff
By Jake Hutchison, 
POSTED: 03/29/18,


Red Bluff >> An incident that began as an animal trapping job in Red Bluff raised
questions about what is and isn’t legal when handling area cats.

Adoption event a success, but some remain

Last week, for three days, PETS and the Tehama County Animal Care Center held the “Home for the Holidays” adoption event. Forty-four animals were adopted. While not all the animals at center were adopted...

Home for the Holidays pet adoption event set

The Tehama County Animal Care Center will be holding a Home for the Holidays pet adoption event Dec. 14-16.

Strikes For Strays to help pet find homes for the holidays

Red Bluff >> Providing Essentials for Tehama Shelter, or PETS, hosted its third annual Strikes For Strays fundraiser Friday at Lariat Bowl to help the dogs and cats in the Tehama County Animal Care Center find homes for the holidays. 

County agencies hold exercise for responders-

Red Bluff >> Two days after a real-life emergency in Rancho Tehama Tuesday that left six people dead, Tehama County agencies were back at work Thursday practicing preparedness in Red Bluff....

Dog beds donated to care center-

Red Bluff >> The Tehama County Animal Care Center has recently received a donation of more than 20 Kuranda dog beds, in addition to parts needed to repair 11 additional beds.

AB109 woodshop and welding programs recognized for sculpture Red Bluff >> The Tehama County AB109 woodshop and welding programs were recognized at Tuesday’s meeting by the Board of Supervisors ...

Local charities to receive more than $50K from Rural County Representatives of California raffle

leaders from across the state raised $52,370 for five Tehama County charities

Dog adoption program starts Thursday 8-3-17

On the 1st Thursday of the month PETS will sponsor fees of bully breed dogs whose stay is longer than 30 days. Cost: $30.

Read the Daily News Article here.

Learn  all  about   PETS-  

Click on the cover page of the Tehama Magazine from  Spring 2017

Current events concerning local feral cats...

Corning City Council discusses Feral Cat Problems.

Read the Daily News Article here.

Use the Paypal Donate button or our online store for your membership and gift giving opportunities.  Thank you.

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Contact information-

P.E.T.S.
P.O. Box 1174
Red Bluff, CA 96080
Phone:  530.527.8702

Email:  petstehama@gmail.com  

Tehama pet and stray adoption/advocacy - and assistance.

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